an ode to our pig pig

an ode to our pig pig

It seems so ridiculous crying over a pig. But he was my Pig Pig, my little Kevin Bacon. I’d wanted a pig my entire life and finally, at 29, I got my pig. I had to drive four hours to pick him up with my sick daughter in the backseat, and miserable the whole time. She had to miss a day of school, but it was early in the year and she would have been home sick anyways, so off we went.

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Post-Wedding Musings

I don't think I have ever enjoyed a day more in my life.

Bold statement, right? But I absolutely mean it. Our wedding day was exactly what we wanted--a day full of family, and laughter; it was a day to celebrate our love, and our life together. It was a great day. 

I didn't have to worry about decor, or guests showing up with unaccounted plus ones. There was no concern about a bridesmaid being a diva, a photographer getting lost, or having my makeup resemble a Vaudeville act rather than my own style. True to form, I forgot the hand-lettered vows that I had made, and instead wrote them out on hotel stationary; even this didn't stress me out, which was a wonderful surprise.

Our ceremony was beautifully simple, and perfectly us. Our daughter walked me down the longest aisle in the world, which was such a beautiful and special moment for both of us to enjoy. On a peninsula surrounded by a lake we said our vows in front of our parents, half of our siblings, and all of our nieces; our daughter was included in the ring ceremony, with my emerald ring gifted to her as a symbol of our new family. After, we headed to a local winery, Liquidity, and shot our photos in their vineyard before enjoying a wonderful meal in their restaurant. We all sat at one table, family chatting with family, Taylor and I basking in the glow of our brand-new marriage. 

It was everything that we dreamed of, and we couldn't be happier to be Mr and Mrs Fisher. 


We didn't make speeches, but I wanted to share my gratitude for those that played a part in our day. 

A million thanks to our wonderful friend Lyn who served as bridesmaid, witness, sounding board, driver, and photographer. You're the corkscrew to my wine, or something like that. Thank you for sharing your best friend with me. 

To our parents--your support means more to us than we can possibly put into words. Thank you for everything that you do.  

Sare: for twenty years you have been so many things to me, and not a day goes by that I don't thank all of the gods for having you in my life. On a less sappy note-- I'm sorry there was still green in my hair at the wedding, I really did try. 

To the other Fishers: Thank you for sharing the day with us, and making my dress happen. Nitwick. Blubber. Oddment. Tweak.

Ashley Fisher

About Wonderland Media

Wonderland Media was created to provide startups, businesses, and bloggers with a resource to help them meet their goals. We are digital storytellers, using your unique story to connect potential customers with your brand. After diving deep into your business, we will craft a unique multi-platform marketing campaign that will best meet your short- and long-term business goals. Best of all, we will use quantifiable data gathered throughout the campaign so that you can see exactly how we are positively influencing your business.

We specialize in: social media marketing & community management, event planning & publicity, digital marketing (including Pay-Per-Click & ethical SEO), content generation, and graphic design.

About Ashley Heinaranta

Throughout her decade in various marketing roles, Ashley has guided countless businesses through the muddy waters of creating an “online presence”. With experience in branding, consulting on business and marketing plans, graphic design, and digital marketing, she is a powerhouse of knowledge and experience. Ashley loves to work with start ups, bloggers, and small business owners, as well as established businesses and brands. No project is too small for her, and she loves the unique challenge that every project presents.

you know what they say about hindsight

As a child, I remember thinking about my grandpa with a mix of admiration, respect, and unconditional love. Born and raised in Helsinki, Finland, his stoic personality was very typically Finnish. Reserved, soft-spoken, and smart as a whip, he was a man of few words; when he did speak, though, you felt compelled to listen, and to absorb. A pillar of strength and knowledge, he also had a soft spot for "his girls". His wife, my mother and her sisters, and us female grandchildren--we were collectively known as "his girls", and he loved us dearly. And, in return, he was loved more than I think he ever knew. 

My experience and memories of my grandfather are drastically different than those of my mom; as his middle, and most rebellious, daughter, she was often on the receiving end of a lecture from him. As a father he was a strict, but consistent, man; rules were made to be followed, and breaking those rules would result in punishment. But for me, Grandpa was sweet, and kind. There weren't many rules for me to follow, except to stay out of his garden and to never walk on the front lawn because that is what the sidewalk is for. He was the man that would take me to stores where we would sometimes buy candy, and name every flower that we saw along the way. He would play me whichever new band he had found, although the only one that sticks out in my mind is a band made up of twelve incredible talented Japanese girls. We would sit in the garden, and drink iced tea, while I relayed to him schoolyard stories, or what I had done at summer camp. 

Everything changed when he entered long-term care. I didn't visit as often as I should have because of the anxiety that being on his floor would give me. There were plenty of other people that were grandmas and grandpas, siblings, parents, and friends, in the ward; all were in varying stages of death. Some moaned in pain constantly, some were spending the rest of their days mostly comatose in their beds. And my sweet, loving grandfather was there with him. 

After his first strokes, his language skills started to slip away. It would frustrate him to no end to struggle with his words; a man once deliberate with his speech was relegated to miming his thoughts, with a mixed jumble of words to sort out in your head. It was heartbreaking for me in a way I can hardly describe. I would sit with him, and tell him about Audrey's newest obsession and about my day-to-day life. When it was time to leave, I would sit in my car in the parking lot, tears streaming down my cheeks, for upwards of an hour before pulling myself together for the ride home. Every visit was as taxing as it was rewarding; seeing him regain his speech and some of his mobility was truly a blessing, while the emotional toll of the visit would leave me in a cloud of sadness and frustration for days. 

The very best days were sunny and warm, when we could roll him in his swanky wheelchair outside into the little garden that the hospital tried its best to maintain. On these days, he would be my grandpa again. Laughing, smiling, and enjoying the outdoors--those were the best days. I lived for those days.

Slowly, the best days turned to average, and my visits became less frequent. As his health started to take a downturn, so did my own personal life. As more and more was added to my own whirlwind, I became even more withdrawn from him. I refused to burden him with any of my problems, even though he was the best listener I have ever met. And I certainly couldn't handle the additional emotions that came with visiting, so I chose to stay away. 

Then one day, as is the way of life, he entered the final stage of his life. He was in immense pain; so much so that the nurses began giving him very high doses of pain medication. This resulted in him sleeping a lot, which was peaceful for him. I loved to sit beside him during his naps; I would read, and he would finally be resting beside me. And so I spent many evenings quietly sitting with him, sometimes holding his hand, or telling him about my day. It was easier for me, and it felt better seeing him like this. 

Unfortunately the pain meds changed him when he was awake; he was grumpy and sullen, and his hallucinations were a gruesome combination of wartime flashbacks and otherworldly monsters. I found it incredibly difficult, as you can imagine, to sit with him during these episodes. Perhaps these days were when he needed a comforting presence most, but I spent more time crying in the hall than I did trying to comfort him. Over and over again, he would tell me he was ready to go home; he just wanted peace, and I cannot count how many times he asked us to help him end his life. 

In his true final days, I elected not to visit him. I knew his mind was gone, that he was no longer the grandpa I was trying so hard to hold onto in my memories. I was afraid that if I had to say goodbye to him, to THAT him, rather than the him that I loved so dearly, I would lose grasp of those memories forever. 

So I didn't go. I didn't say goodbye to him until his funeral service, and the selfishness of my choices to not visit him didn't hit me until his urn was placed in his little cubby overlooking the garden at the funeral home. As his wife, and children, and some grandchildren, each placed an item of his that were as special to them as they were to him into the space, it hit me.

I didn't have anything to put in there. 

Ashley Fisher

About Wonderland Media

Wonderland Media was created to provide startups, businesses, and bloggers with a resource to help them meet their goals. We are digital storytellers, using your unique story to connect potential customers with your brand. After diving deep into your business, we will craft a unique multi-platform marketing campaign that will best meet your short- and long-term business goals. Best of all, we will use quantifiable data gathered throughout the campaign so that you can see exactly how we are positively influencing your business.

We specialize in: social media marketing & community management, event planning & publicity, digital marketing (including Pay-Per-Click & ethical SEO), content generation, and graphic design.

About Ashley Heinaranta

Throughout her decade in various marketing roles, Ashley has guided countless businesses through the muddy waters of creating an “online presence”. With experience in branding, consulting on business and marketing plans, graphic design, and digital marketing, she is a powerhouse of knowledge and experience. Ashley loves to work with start ups, bloggers, and small business owners, as well as established businesses and brands. No project is too small for her, and she loves the unique challenge that every project presents.